"Peace begins with truth"

About the book

How do we end the ongoing hostilities between black and white Americans?

 

 

 

 

This vital book considers the compelling and addictive hold that racism has had on centuries of Americans, explores historical and contemporary norms complicit in the problem, and appeals to the U.S. government to improve race relations, rectify existent social imperfections, and guard against future race-based abuses.


Despite an assertion by the founding fathers that "all men are created equal" and the Fourteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution that guarantees "equal protection," the race-based oppression that has characterized most of America's history shows that in practice our society has rarely measured up to principle. Why has deep-seated racial conflict in America continued for so long? This unprecedented examination into the topic explores the evidence and consequences of what seems to be an "addiction" to racism in the United States, analyzing the related disconnect between our nation's stated moral principles and social realities, and assessing how U.S. citizens of all races can take individual action to start the long-needed healing process.

The contributors to this work present interdisciplinary perspectives and discussions on American history, politics, philosophy, and 21st-century psycho-social conditions as they relate to the oppression, social injustice, and racism that have occurred—and continue to occur—in the United States. The discussions allow readers to grasp the serious challenges at hand and direct them towards recognizing the potential for conflict transformation and reconciliation through a non-conventional co-created Truth, Reconciliation, and Peace Process (TRPP) to begin resolving America's dysfunction. This is essential reading for anyone who seeks to understand the sources of perpetual racially based conflict, disparity, and hatred in the United States; identify the social injuries of exposure to centuries of racism; move America towards harmonious interracial relationships; and improve its international standing as a peace-building nation that is truly committed to human rights throughout the world.

Features

  • Presents the inescapable evidence of persistent social violence, inequalities, and injustices perpetrated against blacks within America's borders prior to and for centuries since the nation's founding
  • Identifies the negative psycho-social consequences and harmful impact of "transgenerated trauma"—based on the experiences of living in an overtly oppressive society for centuries—on both the oppressed and the oppressor in America
  • Emphasizes the necessity for all American citizens to share the responsibility for exposing historical truths, working through painful memories and realities, engaging in long-avoided dialogue, and implementing systems to assure a more just America for all its citizens


Sample Topics

  • 2008 and 2009 Congressional Apologies: HR 194 and SR 26
  • Consequences of Historical and Contemporary Racism
  • International Truth and Reconciliation Commissions
  • U.S.-based Truth, Reconciliation, and Peace Initiatives
  • Institutional and Structural Racism
  • Peacebuilding and Reconciliation
  • Post-Slavery Atrocities
  • U.S. Crimes Against Humanity
  • Transgenerated Trauma
  • Truth, Reconciliation, and Peace Process (TRPP)
 

Cover      Hardcover

Pages      310

Volumes  1

Size          6 1/8x9 1/4

ISBN

978-1-4408-3043-3

eISBN

978-1-4408-3044-0

Author/Editor

 

Imani Michelle Scott, PhD

Dr. Imani Michelle Scott_Headshot (3).jpg
 
 

Dr. Imani Michelle Scott is a scholar, consultant, practitioner and specialist in the areas of human communication, conflict analysis and conflict resolution. She is an award-winning writer and a frequent guest speaker at national and international symposiums on the topics of resilience, domestic violence, transgenerated transmissions of trauma, community-based violence and more. Additionally, she has distinguished and published articles and presentations on topics related to truth and reconciliation processes, police violence, school violence, intercultural communication, and conflict resolution.

 Dr. Scott holds a doctorate in Conflict Analysis and Resolution from Nova Southeastern University, a Master of Arts in Speech Communication from Montclair State University and a Bachelor of Arts in Communication Arts from Florida Atlantic University.

 Presently, Dr. Scott is a Professor of Communication for the internationally-acclaimed university for art and design, the Savannah College of Art and Design (SCAD). At SCAD, Dr. Scott teaches courses in Intercultural Communication and Public Speaking and facilitates the University’s Faculty Development Program. 

Dr. Scott is on the Advisory Board for The Truth Telling Project and a Principal Consultant for Relationship Building Associates. She has present and past associations with the Association for Conflict Resolution, the American Association for Blacks in Higher Education, the National Action Network, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, the American Association for University Professors, Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc., and the Women’s Resource Center to End Domestic Violence Speaker’s Bureau.

Her primary interests include research, writing, and presentations on topics of conflict resolution, race relations, relationship-building, resilience studies, domestic violence, school violence, trauma management, and identity conflict.

To access Huffington Post contributions visit: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/imani-michelle-scott-phd/

To access The 411: Conflict Transformation blogtalk radio show archives visit: www.blogtalkradio.com/gumboforthesoul

 

 

 

 

Contributors

 

 

Email Trina A. Brown

Trina A. Brown, PhD

Dr. Brown, a native of Chicago, Illinois, received a bachelor of arts degree in psychology from Spelman College, and master’s and doctoral degrees in cognition and development from Emory University. Her postgraduate studies have been dedicated to exploring autobiographical memory development in children and its impact on various aspects of memory performance and identity development. Dr. Brown’s research interests also include the influence of stress on memory, general identity development, and racial identity development. Currently, Dr. Brown is a professor at the Savannah College of Art and Design’s Atlanta campus, where she teaches Introduction to Psychology, the Psychology of Self, and the Psychology of Group Processes.

Yes, I am interested and available for guest lecture, panel discussion and other presentations opportunities.

 


 
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Email Sean Byrne 

Sean Byrne, PhD

Sean Byrne is Professor and Director of the PhD and Joint MA Programs in Peace and Conflict Studies (PACS), and Director, Arthur V. Mauro Centre for Peace and Justice, St. Paul’s College, University of Manitoba. He founded the Mauro Centre and the PACS Ph.D. Program with Jessica Senehi. They cofounded the Joint Master’s PACS Program with Anna Snyder, Brian Rice and Dean Peachey of the University of Winnipeg. His current research interests include: ethnic conflict resolution, economic aid and peacebuilding in protracted ethnic conflict, children and war, women and peacebuilding, human rights, international peacebuilding, violence intervention and prevention, and third party intervention.

Yes, I am interested and available for guest lecture, panel discussion and other presentations opportunities.

 


 
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Email Leah Creque 

Leah Creque, PhD

Dr. Creque holds a doctorate from Emory University and serves on the faculty of Morehouse College as an associate professor of English. Her research and writing center on the cultural history of the African diaspora as it is manifested in dance and literature. Dr. Creque has made literary contributions to a number of anthologies and journals, including the Journal of African Literature and College Language Association Journal. 

Yes, I am interested and available for guest lecture, panel discussion and other presentations opportunities.


 
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Email Tony Gaskew

Tony Gaskew, PhD

Dr. Gaskew is an associate professor of criminal justice and director of the Criminal Justice Program at the University of Pittsburgh (Bradford). He is a Fulbright Hays Scholar, an FDD Academic Fellow, and a University of Pittsburgh Faculty Diversity Fellow. He is the chair of the President’s Advisory Board on Diversity and the board president of the Consortium of Educational Resources on Islamic Studies, and serves as a Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (HumanDHS) research team member. Dr. Gaskew has been actively involved in creating postsecondary prison education initiatives at the federal Bureau of Prisons (BOP) since 2007. In 2010, he received the Volunteer of the Year Award from (BOP) FCI McKean. He is the author of numerous publications, including the books Policing Muslim American Communities (2009) and Rethinking Prison Reentry: Transforming Humiliation into Humility (2014). Dr. Gaskew is a former police-detective at the Melbourne Police Department, where he was assigned as a 10-year member of the Department of Justices, Organized Crime Drug Enforcement Task Force (OCDETF).

Yes, I am interested and available for guest lecture, panel discussion and other presentations opportunities.


 

Email Toran Hansen

Toran Hansen, PhD

Toran earned his PhD in Social Work from the University of Minnesota in 2010. During his time there, he worked as a Research Associate for the Center for Restorative Justice and Peacemaking, as well as the Center for Urban and Regional Affairs. His dissertation research examined facilitation within the Minnesota peace movement. In 2004, he graduated with a Master’s degree in Conflict Analysis and Resolution from Nova Southeastern University, where he also worked as a Research Associate for the Institute for Child Health Policy. Prior to that, Toran was a Peace Corps Volunteer in Guinea, West Africa and a Program Director for the Fraser Youth Supervision Program in British Columbia, Canada, where he grew up. Toran has mediated disputes for the Palm Beach County Courthouse, Nova Southeastern University, and the Minnesota Department of Corrections. His scholarly interests include: restorative justice, social justice, social movements, social networks, and social capital. He has also created an innovative approach to conflict resolution, which is called the generalist approach and is discussed in his book The Generalist Approach to Conflict Resolution: A Guidebook.

Yes, I am interested and available for guest lecture, panel discussion and other presentations opportunities.


 

Email Sarah Hollingsworth

Sarah E. Hollingsworth

Ms. Hollingsworth received her Bachelor of Science degree in communication studies from Georgia Southern University and a master of arts degree from The University of North Carolina at Greensboro. She is currently a doctoral fellow in the communication studies department at Southern Illinois University. Her research interests include social movements, social change, political communication, and community engagement.

Yes, I am interested and available for guest lecture, panel discussion and other presentations opportunities.


 

Email Spoma Jovanovic

Spoma Jovanovic, PhD

Dr. Jovanovic is a professor in the Communication Studies Department at The University of North Carolina at Greensboro. Her research focuses on community projects that explore how ethics in communication and activism influence the outcomes of initiatives for social change. She is the author of Democracy, Dialogue, and Community Action: Truth and Reconciliation in Greensboro (2012) and more than a dozen journal articles and book chapters.

Yes, I am interested and available for guest lecture, panel discussion and other presentations opportunities.


 

Email Mansa King

Mansa Bilal Mark King, PhD

Dr. King is an assistant professor of sociology in the Department of Sociology at Morehouse College in Atlanta, Georgia, where he teaches courses on masculinity and families. He also teaches an Africana Families course for the Morehouse Pan-African Global Experience (MPAGE), a study abroad program in Ghana. Dr. King’s research has covered father figures in Black America and interreligious Akan families in Ghana. He is currently finishing a study on race and marital behavior among American Muslims, continuing to help build a digital archive on African American Muslim history, and starting a study on African American Muslim childrearing strategies.

Yes, I am interested and available for guest lecture, panel discussion and other presentations opportunities.


 

Email Bini Litwin

Bini Litwin, PhD

Dr. Litwin is an associate professor in the College of Health Care Sciences at Nova Southeastern University in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, where she earned her doctorate in conflict analysis and resolution. Her areas of expertise include cultural diversity, organizational behavior, conflict analysis and resolution and gender issues. She has extensive experience in healthcare administration and has presented original research at numerous national and international conferences. She is the author of Playing on the Boy’s Team: Success Narratives of Executive Women in Healthcare (2012) and A Conceptual Framework for a Multi-Factor, Multi-Level Analysis of the Origins of Workplace Violence (2002).

Yes, I am interested and available for guest lecture, panel discussion and other presentations opportunities.


 

Email Cindy Lutenbacher

Cindy Lutenbacher, PhD

Dr. Lutenbacher is an associate professor of English at Morehouse College, where she has taught composition and creative writing since 1990. She earned her MFA from Washington University in St. Louis and her doctorate from Northwestern University in Chicago.  Her particular areas of study are pedagogical philosophy and assessment in the teaching of writing; public schools and “power teachers” (Asa Hilliard); and creative nonfiction.  Future projects include collaboration with Tsehaye Geralyn Hebert on a creative work centered upon racism in the 21st century. Dr. Lutenbacher lives in Atlanta with her two daughters.

Yes, I am interested and available for guest lecture, panel discussion and other presentations opportunities.


 

Email Jamila Lyn

Jamila Lyn, PhD

Dr. Jamila S. Lyn earned her doctorate in English from Georgia State University and teaches composition, research writing, and world litera­ture at Morehouse College. Her research interests include the depiction of black women in literature/film, the construction of black manhood, and pop culture criticism. Awarded a UNCF/Mellon Faculty Doctoral Fellowship, Dr. Lyn’s dissertation research focused on James Baldwin’s unique spatial theory and the emergent conversation on democracy in Giovanni’s Room, Tell Me How Long the Train’s Been Gone, and If Beale Street Could Talk. She is a New York native and Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Trinity University, in Washington, DC.

Yes, I am interested and available for guest lecture, panel discussion and other presentations opportunities.


 

Email Anthony Neal

Anthony Sean Neal, PhD

Dr. Neal completed his undergraduate degree in religion andphilosophy at Morehouse College. He earned the top average in religion, which garnered him a full scholarship to Mercer University’s McAfee School of Theology. During this period, Dr. Neal concentrated his studies in the areas of philosophical theology and political philosophy. His capstone thesis was entitled “Transforming Community Consciousness.” After leaving Mercer, Dr. Neal earned his doctorate in Humanities from Clark Atlanta University, where his studies focused on African American philosophy and religion. The title of his dissertation is “Common Ground: A Comparison of the Ideas of Consciousness in the Writings of Howard W. Thurman and Huey P. Newton.” Dr. Neal has presented papers at many major conferences, such as American Association of Religion, Philosophy Born of Struggle, and National Council of Black Studies, to name a few. His specialization areas areaesthetics, Africana philosophy and religious thought, critical theory, political philosophy, and philosophy of religion.

Yes, I am interested and available for guest lecture, panel discussion and other presentations opportunities.


 

Email Megan Price

Megan Price

Ms. Price is the director of the Insight Conflict Resolution Program at George Mason University's School for Conflict Analysis and Resolution. Her research focuses on developing a reliable, context-based method for reconciling systemic social conflict. In practice, she applies the Insight approach to conflict analysis and resolution to endemic social problems such as retaliatory violence, police legitimacy and the school-to-prison pipeline. Ms. Price is a PhD candidate at the School for Conflict Analysis and Resolution and earned her master of philosophy degree in reconciliation from the University of Dublin, Trinity College in Belfast, Northern Ireland. She completed undergraduate work at Reed College in Portland, Oregon.

Yes, I am interested and available for guest lecture, panel discussion and other presentations opportunities.


 

Email Imani Scott

Imani Michelle Scott, PhD

Dr. Imani Michelle Scott is a scholar, consultant, practitioner and specialist in the areas of human communication, conflict analysis and conflict resolution. She is an award-winning writer and a frequent guest speaker at national and international symposiums on the topics of resilience, domestic violence, transgenerated transmissions of trauma, community-based violence and more. Additionally, she has distinguished and published articles and presentations on topics related to truth and reconciliation processes, police violence, school violence, intercultural communication, and conflict resolution. 

Dr. Scott holds a doctorate in Conflict Analysis and Resolution from Nova Southeastern University, a Master of Arts in Speech Communication from Montclair State University and a Bachelor of Arts in Communication Arts from Florida Atlantic University. 

Presently, Dr. Scott is a Professor of Communication for the internationally-acclaimed university for art and design, the Savannah College of Art and Design (SCAD). At SCAD, Dr. Scott teaches courses in Intercultural Communication and Public Speaking and facilitates the University’s Faculty Development Program.

Dr. Scott is on the Advisory Board for The Truth Telling Project and a Principal Consultant for Relationship Building Associates. She has present and past associations with the Association for Conflict Resolution, the American Association for Blacks in Higher Education, the National Action Network, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, the American Association for University Professors, Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc., and the Women’s Resource Center to End Domestic Violence Speaker’s Bureau.

Her primary interests include research, writing, and presentations on topics of conflict resolution, race relations, relationship-building, resilience studies, domestic violence, school violence, trauma management, and identity conflict. 

To access Huffington Post contributions visit: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/imani-michelle-scott-phd/

To access The 411: Conflict Transformation blogtalk radio show archives visit: www.blogtalkradio.com/gumboforthesoul

Yes, I am interested and available for guest lecture, panel discussion and other presentations opportunities.


 

Email Barbara Strahl

Barbara Timmons Strahl, PhD

Dr. Strahl earned her doctorate in conflict analysis and resolution from Nova Southeastern University. Today she serves as a consultant, educator, and mediator. Dr. Strahl is an experienced practitioner, mediator, facilitator, and professor who is nationally recognized for her dedication to the fields of peacemaking, conflict transformation, and restorative and social justice. Dr. Strahl teaches at the University of North Carolina Greensboro in the postgraduate Conflict and Peace Studies Program and at Nova Southeastern University in the doctoral Health Sciences Program.   Involvement in the field of conflict resolution has led her to serve on numerous boards, including the National Association for Community Mediation (NAFCM), where she served two terms as board chair. She is a founding director for the Nevada Mediation Group. 

Yes, I am interested and available for guest lecture, panel discussion and other presentations opportunities.


 

Email Bentley Wallace

Bentley Gibson Wallace, PhD

Dr. Bentley Gibson Wallace, a native of White Plains, New York, earned her bachelor of arts in psychology from Spelman College and her master’s and doctoral degrees in psychology from Emory University. Dr. Wallace’s master’s research focused on the development of African American children’s racial and gender identity and preferences.  Her doctoral research focused on the unconscious (implicit) racial attitudes of African American children and young adults about their own racial group.  Her main research goals are to determine what factors are associated with positive in-group attitudes in members of socially stigmatized groups.  After graduate school, she decided to take a position as Assistant Professor of Psychology at Georgia Highlands College.

Yes, I am interested and available for guest lecture, panel discussion and other presentations opportunities.

 

Chapter Highlights


Foreword

by Sean Byrne, Ph.D.

  • The pervasiveness of racism in contemporary America.
  • Colonialism as the foundation upon which the legacy of racism began.
  • The consequences of institutional and structural racism in the U.S.
  • American racism since the elections of President Barack Obama.
  • The necessity of addressing racism as a prerequisite for building a lasting peace.


Introduction

by Imani Michelle Scott, Ph.D.

  • The basis and call for a truth and reconciliation process in the U.S. to address historical and contemporary oppression against African Americans.
  • The unfinished business of the 2008 and 2009 Congressional apologies.
  • The need for Americans to learn and courageously confront painful truths.
  • The responsibility all Americans have to support a more united America.
  • The social construction race.
  • Recent examples of the deadly consequences of racism in the U.S.


Chapter One

A Searching and Moral Inventory: Considerations on a Truth, Reconciliation, and Peace Process in the United States

by Imani Michelle Scott, Ph.D.

  • The addictive hold that racism has on Americans.
  • The types of atrocities endured by African Americans for centuries in the U.S.
  • The reasons financial reparations are not the solution to heal the wounds of racism.
  • The failure of the United Nations to act.
  • The reasons blacks can’t just “get over it”
  • Evidence of heightened racial tension, discrimination and discord since the election of President Barack Obama.


Chapter Two

Collective Neuroticism: Consequences and Manifestations of Communal Trauma  

by Trina A. Brown, Ph.D. and Bentley Gibson Wallace, Ph.D.

  • The psychological consequences of slavery and Jim Crow on African Americans.
  • Communal trauma and group symptomatology.
  • Racial identity development and self-esteem in children.
  • The link between internalized negative stereotypes and academic achievement.
  • The consequences of implicit race-based attitudes on physical health.
  • Violence and victimization in the African American community.
  • The role of government in collective healing.


Chapter Three

Imposing Morality: Cultural Perspectives on Truth, Apologies, and Forgiveness in the United States (A Critical Analysis of American Political Philosophy)

by Anthony Sean Neal, Ph.D.

  • The origin, development and nature of the United States’ moral character
  • The irrationality of presuming a simultaneous coexistence of freedom and oppression in one entity
  • The inability to impose morality
  • Shifting the ethos of a society
  • Reasons compelling the U.S. to restore its moral authority
  • The roles of truth, apology and forgiveness in reconciliation


Chapter Four

Ideal Culture vs. Real Culture: Reflections on the Links between America’s Core Values and the Values of Truth and Reconciliation Initiatives

by Mansa Bilal Mark King, Ph.D.; Cindy Lutenbacher, Ph.D. and Leah Creque, Ph.D.

  • The discrepancy between ideal and real U.S. culture
  • An exploration of “bad” black culture
  • The rhetoric of covert racism
  • American cultural values (i.e., individualism, competition) and racism
  • Likely resistance to a U.S. truth and reconciliation process
  • The roles of collective guilt and collective responsibility in society
  • Critical ingredients of an “acceptable” U.S. truth and reconciliation process

 

Chapter Five

Assessing “Effectiveness” and Contemplating “Justice”: Employing Case Studies to Inform an African American Truth and Reconciliation Process 

by Toran Hansen, Ph.D.

  • The instructive value several truth and reconciliation commissions (Canada, Greensboro, North Carolina, Mauritius, and South Africa) have for the U.S.
  • Important lessons to support the implementation of a U.S. based truth process
  • Criteria to determine the effectiveness of a truth and reconciliation process
  • Considerations on reconciliation in light of paradigms for retributive and restorative justice 
  • Tensions and questions to consider in the planning of a truth and reconciliation process  


Chapter Six

Revisiting History: Examining Post-Slavery and Post-Holocaust Events for Considerations on Advancing Atonement in the United States

by Bini Litwin, Ph.D. and Barbara Timmons Strahl, Ph.D.

  • Failed attempts to atone for crimes against humanity in the U.S.
  • The government’s role in the Freedman’s Bureau and race commissions
  • Specific racial atrocities: the Tulsa race riot, the Rosewood Massacre, and the Tuskegee experiment
  • The role of the U.S. in seeking atonement for human rights abuses in other nations
  • State actions taken to atone for Holocaust-related crimes against humanity
  • The roles of recognition, reparation and restitution in the pursuit of social justice
  • Challenges experienced and lessons learned from post-Holocaust reconciliation events and efforts


Chapter Seven

An Ethical Imperative: The Pursuit of Truth, Forgiveness, and Reconciliation in Greensboro

by Spoma Jovanovic, Ph.D. and Sarah E. Hollingsworth

  • The events of 1979 that led to the establishment of the first US-based Truth and Reconciliation Commission in Greensboro, North Carolina
  • The power and rewards of citizen-inspired action to collectively build healthy communities and interracial relationships
  • Episodes of dialogic courage, apologies, and forgiveness in Greensboro
  • Specific activities, initiatives and events implemented through the Greensboro Commission
  • Government resistance to the Greensboro Commission
  • Challenges experienced and lessons learned from Greensboro’s story


Chapter Eight

Reconfiguring Traditional Prescriptive Approaches to Truth and Reconciliation Processes: Adapting the Elicitive-Centered Insight Approach for the United States

by Megan Price

  • The story of Raheem
  • Five predominant prescriptive criteria of truth and reconciliation processes
  • The benefits and challenges of traditional prescriptive approaches, criteria and solutions to truth and reconciliation processes
  • The advantages of using elicitive prescription for truth and reconciliation processes
  • The Insight Approach to conflict analysis as an effective elicitive option
  • The Retaliatory Violence Insight Project (RVIP)


Chapter Nine 

The Policing of the Black American Male: Transforming Humiliation into Humility in Pursuit of Truth and Reconciliation

by Tony Gaskew, Ph.D.

  • The post-secondary prison education pedagogy: the Humiliation to Humility Perspective (HHP)
  • The triads of culpability inherent in crime and justice in America
  • The politics of shaming, self-segregation, and transgenerational learned helplessness
  • The pedagogical racial gap
  • Transforming from black criminal offender to black student
  • From correctional facilities to correctional learning centers
  • Reconciling Black Cultural Privilege (BCP)


Chapter Ten

African American Millennials in the Age of Trayvon: Keepin’ It Real

by Jamila Lyn, Ph.D. and Imani Michelle Scott, Ph.D.

  • Racial identity, conflict and pride in African American college students
  • Knowledge of African American history amongst black college students
  • Perceptions of America’s racial condition in the midst of an appeal for justice in the murder of Trayvon Martin
  • Considerations on how young black males are viewed in contemporary America
  • Future outlooks on racism in America from the perspective of African American millenials


Chapter Eleven

Moving Forward to Liberty and Justice for All

by Imani Michelle Scott, Ph.D.

  • Expectant opposition to the call for a U.S.-based truth and reconciliation process
  • Addressing and moving pass realistic challenges
  • The penalties of social tyranny to the oppressor and the oppressed
  • The myth and illusion of racial supremacy
  • The shared responsibility of all Americans (i.e., patriots) to work collectively for a better nation
  • Requisite paradigm shifts towards critically conscious thinking to produce a more perfect union, and a truly united States of America

Endorsements

This book by Imani Michelle Scott is a powerful and meaningful exploration of the issues of truth and reconciliation, and race and racism in America and beyond. If people want to have a clear understanding about what African Americans have experienced over the years and how we are willing to have a true discussion on race and racism, then this book is a must read. Enjoy every page, every sentence and every word; in them, you will find a sense of history as well as some enlightening guidelines about the future.
— Charles J. Ogletree, Jr. Jesse Climenko Professor of Law; Founding & Executive Director, Charles Hamilton Houston Institute for Race & Justice Harvard University Cambridge, MA

This new collection of work does an excellent job of presenting social, historical, political, ethical, moral, psychological, judicial, cultural and practical evidence to support its call to action.
— Johan Galtung, Founder TRANSCEND International and Professor of Peace Studies

Truth and reconciliation efforts have emerged as an important tool in efforts to promote justice, healing and understanding in the aftermath of crimes against humanity. This ambitious collection makes the case for why the United States should launch truth and reconciliation efforts to address the deep scars of our long history of violence and oppression against African-Americans. This courageous and thoughtful call to action is relevant reading for anyone who believes in America’s founding moral principles — and supports the ongoing struggle to live up to them.
— Elizabeth Kiss President & Professor of Philosophy and Women's Studies Agnes Scott College Decatur, Georgia

Dr. Imani Michelle Scott and the contributors to this volume have taken on an important conflict-transformation approach to healing the wounds that divide people in the United States through a federal truth and reconciliation process. This is a timely volume that explores [truth and reconciliation in the United States] from a transdisciplinary perspective…
— Sean Byrne, Director Peace and Conflict Studies Arthur V. Mauro Centre for Peace and Justice St. Paul’s College University of Manitoba Winnepeg, Canada

Upcoming Presentations, Readings and Signings by Dr. Imani Michelle Scott include:

Tuesday, May 10 thru Saturday, May 14, 2016

2016 Winnipeg International Storytelling Festival, Winnipeg, Manitoba Canada

Thursday, December 3, 2015

The Tribe Family Channel * Radio Interview

 November 13, 2015

The Ferguson Truth Initiative, Ferguson, MO

September 29, 2015

International Center for Transitional Justice, Intensive Course on Truth Commissions, Barcelona, Spain

Thursday, July 30, 2015

International Institute on Peace Education. From Selma to Ferguson to beyond: Building communities of justice through truth and reconciliation. University of Toledo. Toledo, OH. Available online at: http://ustre.am/:4Hv4G

 Saturday, June 27, 2015

Violence in America: Exposure through Truth Telling with Dr. Angela Davis

St. Louis, MO

Friday, April 10, 2015

Thinking through a Peace and Reconciliation Process for Americans: Lessons from Ferguson and Atlanta *  The Atlantic Institute: Fostering Dialogues in Education, Ethics and Nonviolent Peace Building: Global, Social and Religious Movements * Morehouse College. Martin Luther King, Jr. International Chapel. Atlanta, GA

Friday, March 13, 2015 9:00 a.m.

The Truth Telling Project Weekend

Cardinal Ritter College Preparatory. Ferguson/St. Louis, MO

Tuesday, January 20, 2015   4:00 p.m.

George Mason University

School of Conflict Analysis and Resolution * Fairfax, VA

Sunday, November 9, 2014   2:00 p.m.

National Center for Civil and Human Rights.  100 Ivan Allen Jr. Blvd. Atlanta, GA

 Wednesday, October 22, 2014   5:30 p.m.

Clark Atlanta University, Atlanta GA

Robert W. Woodruff Library - Exhibition Hall223 James P. Brawley Drive SWAtlanta, GA

 Sunday, October 5, 2014    3:00 p.m.

Savannah College of Art Design Digital Media Center1611 W. Peachtree Street Atlanta, GA

 Friday, September 26, 2014    2:00 p.m.

Congressional Black Caucus Foundation Conference Walter E. Washington Convention Center – Exhibition Hall * 801 Mt. Vernon Place NWWashington, DC

 

Order Crimes against Humanity in the Land of the Free

 

How do we end the ongoing hostilities between black and white Americans?

 

Cover      Hardcover

Pages      310

Volumes  1

Size          6 1/8x9 1/4

ISBN

978-1-4408-3043-3

eISBN

978-1-4408-3044-0


Contact 

Name *
Name

Presidential Remarks

 

From President William Jefferson Clinton

 

"We have learned one clear lesson, that when we embrace one another across the lines that divide us, we become more than the sum of our parts, a community of communities, a nation of nations. Together, we work to face the future as one America, undaunted, undivided, grateful for the chance to live together as one people.”

 “To be sure, our work is not finished and we have our own problems. But when we began as a nation, our Founders knew that, and called us always to the work of forming a more perfect Union“.

 

Source: Public Papers of the Presidents of the United States: William J. Clinton (1998, Book I)][April 2, 1998]_[Pages 494-497]_[From the U.S. Government Printing Office www.gpo.gov]_Remarks at Goree Island, Senegal_April 2, 1998

 

From President George W. Bush

 

“For 250 years the captives endured an assault on their culture and their dignity. The spirit of Africans in America did not break. Yet the spirit of their captors was corrupted. Small men took on the powers and airs of tyrants and masters. Years of unpunished brutality and bullying and rape produced a dullness and hardness of conscience. Christian men and women became blind to the clearest commands of their faith and added hypocrisy to injustice. A republic founded on equality for all became a prison for millions. And yet in the words of the African proverb, "no fist is big enough to hide the sky." All the generations of oppression under the laws of man could not crush the hope of freedom and defeat the purposes of God.”

“My nation's journey toward justice has not been easy and it is not over. The racial bigotry fed by slavery did not end with slavery or with segregation. And many of the issues that still trouble America have roots in the bitter experience of other times. But however long the journey, our destination is set: liberty and justice for all.”

Source: President Bush Speaks at Goree Island in Senegal_Remarks by the President on Goree Island Goree Island, Senegal _georgewbush-whitehouse.archives.gov › News & Policies › July 2003_press release July 8, 200_Retrieved 04-05-13

 

From President Barack Obama

 

“I think it's going to be important for all of us to do some soul-searching.  There has been talk about should we convene a conversation on race.  I haven't seen that be particularly productive when politicians try to organize conversations.  On the other hand, in families and churches and workplaces, there's the possibility that people are a little bit more honest, and at least you ask yourself your own questions, [for example] Am I judging people as much as I can, based on not the color of their skin, but the content of their character?”

“ … we have to be vigilant and we have to work on these issues.  And those of us in authority should be doing everything we can to encourage the better angels of our nature, as opposed to using these episodes to heighten divisions.”

Source: The White House_ Office of the Press Secretary_ For Immediate Release_ July 19, 2013 

Remarks by the President on Trayvon Martin_ James S. Brady Press Briefing Room_ 1:33 P.M. EDT

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PRESS RELEASE

                                                                                                Contact: Imani Michelle Scott, PhD

Imani@crimesagainsthumanitybook.com

(404) 241-1408

www.crimesagainsthumanitybook.com

                                                                                                  http://youtu.be/GU5G5s49Avo

Book calls on U.S. Congress to act on its 2008 and 2009 apologies to African Americans by addressing links between present-day racial conflict and centuries of American racism.

 

ATLANTA, December 5, 2014 – In Imani Michelle Scott’s recently released book, Crimes Against Humanity in the Land of the Free: Can a Truth and Reconciliation Process Heal Racial Conflict in America?, a collection of north American scholar-activists propose the implementation of a U.S.-based, government-sanctioned Truth, Reconciliation, and Peace Process (TRPP) to deal once and for all with centuries of American racism.

 

This “all hands on deck” approach to confronting and ending American racism advises that many lessons can be learned from a national investment in the types of programmatic measures employed by international truth and reconciliation processes. Ironically, the impetus for such processes begins with what the U.S. Congress did in 2008 and 2009: issued governmental apologies for crimes against humanity.

 

In 2008 and 2009, the U.S. Congress issued HR 194 and SR 26. Both Resolutions formally apologize to African Americans “on behalf of the people of the United States, for the wrongs committed against them and their ancestors …”, and acknowledge that “African-Americans continue to suffer from the consequences of slavery and Jim Crow laws …”. In fact, HR 194 pledges a “commitment to rectify the lingering consequences of the misdeeds committed against African Americans under slavery and Jim Crow and to stop the occurrences of human rights violations in the future.”

 

According to Scott, human rights violations against African Americans continue to occur in the U.S. She observed, “The lingering consequences of centuries of oppression and racism are especially apparent today in the recurrent killings of unarmed blacks by white police officers and the historical failure of America’s justice system to hold offenders accountable.”

 

Suggesting that the consequences of centuries of human rights violations are also manifested through transgenerated transmissions of trauma and violence, and perpetual structural and institutional inequalities,

Scott noted it ironic that the U.S. has mandated truth-seeking, truth-telling and reconciliation measures in other nations where atrocities are presumed to have occurred but has not done so within its own borders.

 

Scott, who holds a doctorate in Conflict Analysis and Resolution, expressed pointed concern that contemporary incidents of black-white violence re-traumatize Americans and reflect deep-seated core issues of black-white fear, anger, and hatred.

 

Scott adds: “What we have today is a U.S. Congress that admitted to this nation’s most treacherous, prolonged and deadly series of crimes against humanity and the present-day consequences of those crimes. Without acting to confront America’s racism by investing in truth-telling, peace-building and healing initiatives to account for admitted atrocities, the aftereffects of those atrocities will continually haunt this nation.”

 

 

Crimes against Humanity in the Land of the Free:

Can a Truth and Reconciliation Process heal Racial Conflict in America?

     ISBN 978-1-4408-3043-3 – Hard copy

ISBN 978-1-4408-3044-0 - eBook

   Publisher: Praeger/ABC-CLIO

Author/Editor: Imani Michelle Scott
www.crimesagainsthumanitybook.com

Available on Amazon

PRESS RELEASE

September 24, 2014                                                                          Contact: Imani Michelle Scott, PhD

             imani@crimesagainsthumanitybook.com

www.crimesagainsthumanitybook.com

                                                                                                                          http://youtu.be/GU5G5s49Avo


ATLANTA, Sept. 23, 2014 – Author Imani Michelle Scott’s recently released book, Crimes Against Humanity in the Land of the Free: Can a Truth and Reconciliation Process Heal Racial Conflict in America?, offers an unprecedented examination into enduring racial disparities and tension in the United States and proposes the implementation of a non-conventional, co-created Truth, Reconciliation, and Peace Process (TRPP).

 

This first of its kind book helps readers:

Ø  Understand the sources of perpetual racial conflict in the U.S., and

Ø  Recognize the social injuries of exposure to centuries of oppression and racism

 

Endorsements Pour in for New Book Addressing Oppression and Racial Conflict in the U.S.


This book by Imani Michelle Scott is a powerful and meaningful exploration of the issues of truth and reconciliation, and race and racism in America and beyond. If people want to have a clear understanding about what African Americans have experienced over the years and how we are willing to have a true discussion on race and racism, then this book is a must read. Enjoy every page, every sentence and every word; in them, you will find a sense of history as well as some enlightening guidelines about the future.”

Charles J. Ogletree, Jr.

Harvard University Professor of Law

Founding & Executive Director, Charles Hamilton Houston Institute for Race & Justice

 

This new collection of work does an excellent job of presenting social, historical, political, ethical, moral, psychological, judicial, cultural and practical evidence to support its call to action.”

Johan Galtung, Principle Founder of Peace and Conflict Studies

TRANSCEND International, Professor of Peace Studies

 

Truth and reconciliation efforts have emerged as an important tool in efforts to promote justice, healing and understanding in the aftermath of crimes against humanity.   This ambitious collection makes the case for why the United States should launch truth and reconciliation efforts to address the deep scars of our long history of violence and oppression against African-Americans.  This courageous and thoughtful call to action is relevant reading for anyone who believes in America's founding moral principles -- and supports the ongoing struggle to live up to them.”

Elizabeth Kiss, Renowned Ethicist and President, Agnes Scott College

 

This recently released book offers an unprecedented examination into enduring racial disparities and tension in the United States and proposes the implementation of a non-conventional, co-created Truth, Reconciliation, and Peace Process (TRPP).

 

 

 

 

This first of its kind book helps readers:

Ø  Understand the sources of perpetual racial conflict in the U.S., and

Ø  Recognize the social injuries of exposure to centuries of oppression and racism

 

Upcoming Book Presentations, Readings and Signings by Dr. Imani Michelle Scott include:

 

Friday, September 26, 2014    2:00 p.m.

Congressional Black Caucus Foundation Conference

Walter E. Washington Convention Center – Exhibition Hall

801 Mt. Vernon Place NW

Washington, DC

 

Sunday, October 5, 2014    3:00 p.m.

Savannah College of Art Design

Digital Media Center

1611 W. Peachtree Street

Atlanta, GA

 

Wednesday, October 22, 2014   5:30 p.m.

Clark Atlanta University

Robert W. Woodruff Library - Exhibition Hall

223 James P. Brawley Drive SW

Atlanta, GA

 

Sunday, November 9, 2014   2:00 p.m.

National Center for Civil and Human Rights

100 Ivan Allen Jr. Blvd

Atlanta, GA

 

Tuesday, January 20, 2015   4:00 p.m.

George Mason University

School of Conflict Analysis and Resolution

3434 N. Washington Blvd.

Metropolitan Building, 5th Floor

Arlington, VA 22201

 

Friday, March 13, 2015 9:00 a.m.

The Truth Telling Project Weekend

Cardinal Ritter College Preparatory

Ferguson/St. Louis, Missouri

 

 

Crimes against Humanity in the Land of the Free:

Can a Truth and Reconciliation Process heal Racial Conflict in America?

     ISBN 978-1-4408-3043-3

Upcoming release: August 2014          Publisher: Praeger/ABC-CLIO

Author/Editor: Imani Michelle Scott
www.crimesagainsthumanitybook.com/

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